aerie.

In unexpected news, aerie, the lingerie line from American Eagle, has launched a campaign full of unaltered photos. No airbrushing, no unnecessary editing, nothing. 

The purpose of ‘aerie Real’ is to communicate there is no need to retouch beauty, and to give young women of all shapes and sizes the chance to discover amazing styles that work best for them. We want to help empower young women to be confident in themselves and their bodies. -Jennifer Foyle, Chief Merchandising Officer

They also announced that they plan to incorporate different body types onto their website. I think this is an awesome step in the right direction (yes, I would have loved to see models who aren’t thin, fit, conventionally beautiful, and from a wider range of ethnicities, but Ill take what I can get). The cynic in me can’t help but think that in six weeks or six months, this isn’t going to be the case anymore, but I hope they keep their word.

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Solidarity is For Miley Cyrus

“It is reductive and racist to present one subset of black culture as indicative as the whole,especially when there is a purposeful choice to choose the specific subset of culture that plays into existing white supremacist narratives about the stereotype of what it means to be black. Notice for instance, that Miley did not say “I want a black sound” and then head for the Duke Ellington or Louis Armstrong, or remake herself in the image of Janelle Monae and dabble in Afrofuturism. Nope. Instead she headed straight for the “urban” music, because that is, apparently, the entirety of black culture, and it represents all black people everywhere, regardless of individual experience.”

From an article on Jezebel (of all places!) by NINJACATE. You should read the whole thing because it perfectly expresses how white women devalue black women’s sexuality and cultural identity. As I say, your feminism is intersectional or it is bullshit.

All Hail the Queen? from Bitch Media

These appraisals are perplexing amid a wave of feminist ideology rooted in the idea that women own their bodies. It is the feminism of SlutWalk, the anti-rape movement that proclaims a skimpy skirt does not equal a desire for male attention or sexual availability. Why, then, are cultural critics like Freeman and Petersen convinced that when Beyoncé pops a leather-clad pelvis on stage, it is solely for the benefit of men? Why do others think her acknowledgment of how patriarchy influences our understanding of what’s sexy is mere “lip service”?

Dr. Sarah Jackson, a race and media scholar at Boston’s Northeastern University, says, “The idea that Beyoncé being sexy is only her performing for male viewers assumes that embracing sexuality isn’t also for women.” Jackson adds that the criticism also ignores “the limited choices available to women in the entertainment industry and the limited ways Beyoncé is allowed to express her sexuality, because of her gender and her race.”

One of the best articles about Bey I have ever read. Discusses race, black women, white feminism, media, patriarchy, and girl-on-girl hate. The fact that because Bey wears sexy clothes means she’s not a feminist? Because she’s super hot means she’s not a strong female role model? The fact that she wears a weave means she’s not “black enough” for you?

Through a career that has included crotch-grabbing, nudity, BDSM, Marilyn Monroe fetishizing, and a 1992 book devoted to sex, Madonna has been viewed as a feminist provocateur, pushing the boundaries of acceptable femininity. But Beyoncé’s use of her body is criticized as thoughtless and without value beyond male titillation, providing a modern example of the age-old racist juxtaposition of animalistic black sexuality vs. controlled, intentional, and civilized white sexuality.

READ  THE WHOLE THING I WANT TO QUOTE ALL OF IT.